Ubisoft May Be Changing Its Business Model After GHOST RECON: BREAKPOINT's Underperformance

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Source: Video Games Chronicle

Category: Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Breakpoint

Ubisoft May Be Changing Its Business Model After GHOST RECON: BREAKPOINT's Underperformance

While the majority of Ubisoft's current-gen video games have been successful, both commercially and critically, it's hard to argue with the general consensus that most of the French publisher's titles feel very samey and repetitive. 

With Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Siege, Child of Light, South Park: The Fractured But Whole, ANNO 1800 and Mario + Rabbids Kingdom Battle, Ubisoft has proved that producing unique experiences is still possible at the company — but on the other hand, some players have had a hard time distinguishing Assassin's Creed: Unity from Assassin's Creed: Syndicate, Far Cry 4 from Far Cry 5, The Crew from The Crew 2, Tom Clancy's The Division from Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon: Wildlands, and so on, and so forth.

The rocky launch of Ghost Recon: Breakpoint might've been the straw that broke the camel's back — as Ubisoft is reportedly ready to change its business model and try to make each of its games more original — or at least less monotonous.

According to Video Games Chronicle, Ubisoft is currently re-shaping its editorial team to keep up with the ever-changing market — that has seemingly had enough of the similar-looking titles released by Ubisoft at regular intervals.

Said editorial team is a group of almost 100 developers who oversee all Ubisoft-produced games, making sure that each and every one of them falls in line with the studio's policy (of avoiding controversial topics and turning everything into enormous open-world productions with some light RPG mechanics on top).

We are reinforcing our editorial team to be more agile and better accompany our development teams around the world as they create the best gaming experiences for players,” Ubisoft told VGC in a Friday statement.

Additionally, an anonymous source told VGC: “In the previous system that editorial had, there were often the ideas of just one or two people getting put into every game. That’s why you tended to see such similarity, because it’s the same taste and opinion being replicated.”

As you may know, Ubisoft has delayed Gods & Monsters, Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Quarantine and Watch Dogs: Legion by several months to allow the developers further polish their upcoming titles and avoid another Breakpoint scenario — which was one of the main reasons of the recent management changes at the French publisher.